Mutations in the KCNA1 gene, encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1, have been associated with a spectrum of neurological phenotypes, including episodic ataxia type 1 and developmental and epileptic encephalopathy. We have recently identified a de novo variant in KCNA1 in the highly conserved Pro-Val-Pro motif within the pore of the Kv1.1 channel in a girl affected by early onset epilepsy, ataxia and developmental delay. Other mutations causing severe epilepsy are located in Kv1.1 pore domain. The patient was initially treated with a combination of antiepileptic drugs with limited benefit. Finally, seizures and ataxia control were achieved with lacosamide and acetazolamide. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize Kv1.1 mutant channel to provide a genotype–phenotype correlation and discuss therapeutic options for KCNA1-related epilepsy. To this aim, we transfected HEK 293 cells with Kv1.1 or P403A cDNAs and recorded potassium currents through whole-cell patch-clamp. P403A channels showed smaller potassium currents, voltage-dependent activation shifted by +30 mV towards positive potentials and slower kinetics of activation compared with Kv1.1 wild-type. Heteromeric Kv1.1+P403A channels, resembling the condition of the heterozygous patient, confirmed a loss-of-function biophysical phenotype. Overall, the functional characterization of P403A channels correlates with the clinical symptoms of the patient and supports the observation that mutations associated with severe epileptic phenotype cluster in a highly conserved stretch of residues in Kv1.1 pore domain. This study also strengthens the beneficial effect of acetazolamide and sodium channel blockers in KCNA1 channelopathies

Clinical and Functional Study of a De Novo Variant in the PVP Motif of Kv1.1 Channel Associated with Epilepsy, Developmental Delay and Ataxia

D’Adamo, Maria Cristina
Investigation
;
2022

Abstract

Mutations in the KCNA1 gene, encoding the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1, have been associated with a spectrum of neurological phenotypes, including episodic ataxia type 1 and developmental and epileptic encephalopathy. We have recently identified a de novo variant in KCNA1 in the highly conserved Pro-Val-Pro motif within the pore of the Kv1.1 channel in a girl affected by early onset epilepsy, ataxia and developmental delay. Other mutations causing severe epilepsy are located in Kv1.1 pore domain. The patient was initially treated with a combination of antiepileptic drugs with limited benefit. Finally, seizures and ataxia control were achieved with lacosamide and acetazolamide. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize Kv1.1 mutant channel to provide a genotype–phenotype correlation and discuss therapeutic options for KCNA1-related epilepsy. To this aim, we transfected HEK 293 cells with Kv1.1 or P403A cDNAs and recorded potassium currents through whole-cell patch-clamp. P403A channels showed smaller potassium currents, voltage-dependent activation shifted by +30 mV towards positive potentials and slower kinetics of activation compared with Kv1.1 wild-type. Heteromeric Kv1.1+P403A channels, resembling the condition of the heterozygous patient, confirmed a loss-of-function biophysical phenotype. Overall, the functional characterization of P403A channels correlates with the clinical symptoms of the patient and supports the observation that mutations associated with severe epileptic phenotype cluster in a highly conserved stretch of residues in Kv1.1 pore domain. This study also strengthens the beneficial effect of acetazolamide and sodium channel blockers in KCNA1 channelopathies
KCNA1, ataxia, epilepsy, PVP motif, patch clamp, molecular dynamics, lacosamide
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12572/10185
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